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Health

 
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Please note that the date at the top is for configuration only. The information in this section will be the most up to date for you to access.

Click here for many Mental Health Support contact details.

The current climate can present challenges to both our own or a family member's mental health. It is important to seek support if feelings of worry and anxiety are continually affecting our daily lives. This may include talking to a family member, a friend and/or accessing support from your GP or a mental health professional.  

Click on the above title called Mental Health Support which provides a PDF of some support services available with hyperlinks to each agency's website on the logo.

Health direct

Free Australian health advise you can count on.

Coronavirus Symptom Checker

Beating the stress and worries a guide for parents and young people

My name is coronavirus - child friendly explanation

Looking after our family's mental health during the pandemic

It has been an increasingly difficult time for everyone, placing added pressures on our wellbeing and mental health. The following are some ways we can help our family cope and manage during these challenging times:

  • Set media coverage limits - Although it is important to remain up to date with the latest information, Qld Health recommends setting limits on how often and for how long we check the news each day. To maintain a balance and support our wellbeing, read good news stories too as it is also important to focus on the positive events occurring around us. Keep perspective and try to remain calm – consider what is in your control and think about how you can contribute positively.
  • Helping children cope – children will need varied levels of support depending on their age and development, to help understand what is going on. Limit the amount of media coverage children are exposed to but be there to help them understand what they are watching, when they do view news content. Let them know it's ok to be concerned and allow them to ask questions. Be honest with your answers but don't give too much detail. Take time to listen to their feelings and validate them e.g. "That must have worried you." Reassure them that there are many people out there working to fix the current situation. Click here to watch a clip from Beyond Blue about talking to children about the 'scary' stuff in the news. Ensure you also speak to your child's class teacher if you are having concerns about your child's wellbeing.
  • If your child is at home during the day, maintain normal sleeping routines e.g. keep the same bedtimes. Aim to fit in some time for movement (being physically active) and time for relaxation and fun throughout the day.
  • Seek support – It is important to seek support if feelings of worry and anxiety are continually affecting our daily lives. This may include talking to a family member, a friend or accessing support from your GP or a mental health professional. 

Adapted from the following websites: Beyond Blue, Queensland Health, Education Queensland & Raising Children



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Last reviewed 04 August 2020
Last updated 04 August 2020